Valuing Community Impact

Valuing Community Impact

To value community impact means that research, courses, and service projects begin with recognition of actual existing problems or concerns and are designed with the intention of a making an improvement in specific areas of human need. This concept assumes that community input happens at the forefront of project design for the purpose of co-creating desired outcomes.

Technical Communication for Business Majors

After completing the first course module on personal branding, students will turn their attention to climate-related issues. Working in conjunction with several programs and initiatives both on and off campus, students will consider how climate-related issues affect us both as individuals and employees. For the second course module, students will select a Georgia-based company within the industry they hope to enter, or within which they are already working.

Graphic Medicine: Comics and Mental Illness

Students will have the opportunity to share research about mental health issues by creating digital comics that reduce the stigma surrounding mental illness and that educate the Georgia Tech community about mental health resources on campus.

Sustainable Cities Studio

In this course, we partner with Central Atlanta Progress, who recently completed the Downtown Atlanta Master Plan (https://www.atlantadowntown.com/initiatives/master-plan), focusing specifically on the goals outlined in chapter 5 regarding restoration of the urban forest downtown and enhancing green infrastructure. Students will break into disciplinary teams to accomplish two goals: 1. Compile or create evidence to support the planning goals and their outcomes outlined in chapter 5, and 2. Identify opportunities and implementation strategies to enhance green infrastructure downtown.

Principles of Interaction Design

In this course we will study and explore the principles and practices of interaction design. You will be introduced to a number of different techniques and tools for understanding particular interaction design challenges, you will develop scenarios and storyboards, create low-fidelity prototypes, and iterate on those prototypes to create a final design project.

GT 1000 SLS

This GT 1000 course is focused on Equitable & Sustainable Development as part of the Sustainable Communities summer session track.  Student will learn to evaluate how decisions impact the sustainability of communities.

Technical Communication: The Problem of Water

The technical communication classroom is not just a laboratory space for professional training; it is also a laboratory space for developing the necessary skills to become a responsible citizen (Blake Scott 294). This summer’s experiences should transform you into a more effective communicator who is more aware of the ways that technical communication can be used in both the workplace and the community as a whole. Technical Communication involves working with a variety of stakeholders to utilize and relay information in multiple forms.

France Today I (Sustainable Communities in France)

NOTE: This course is taught at Georgia Tech Lorraine (GTL) in Metz, France.

Field Work Abroad (Local Sustainability Practices)

NOTE: This course is taught at Georgia Tech Lorraine (GTL) in Metz, France.

Food Literacy of Atlanta

In the past decade Atlanta has undergone phenomenal changes in infrastructure, and food culture because of two things: being a beta-hub in the tech industry, and tax credits that have cultivated a thriving film industry. This influx of people, money, and innovation, restaurant culture has seen tremendous growth. This Serve-Learn-Sustain (SLS) course encourages students to learn the story of Atlanta through its food history.

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