Technology for Social Good

Technology for Social Good

Technology for Social Good refers to the use of technology – broadly engineering, applied science and computing-based artifacts, algorithm and techniques – towards addressing pressing social problems. Technology is rarely, if ever, “the” solution, but instead works in concert with non-technology based approaches.

Big Data and Public Policy

The School of Public Policy is offering a new cross-listed course with the School of Economics in Big Data and Public Policy. This course will provide an introduction to data science tools and methodologies for social science applications. Students will learn to conduct experiments and to identify causal mechanisms in large-scale social and administrative data. The course is targeted for Ph.D. or advanced M.S. students in Public Policy; M.S. students in Economics, and M.S. students in Cybersecurity

Data Science for Public Policy

Data Science for Public Policy introduces big data for social science and public policy applications. Students learn foundations of data science and learn to
conduct field experiments with an aim to solve social, environmental problems in major policy areas.

Chemical Principles I Laboratory

The laboratory portion of this course focuses on foundational principles and essential techniques of chemistry. These conceptual and technical tools have great relevance to many issues of importance to society, including climate change, human health, economic security, and more. SLS-related experiments in CHEM 1211K will be related to five threads of sustainability in chemistry: Green Chemistry, Chemistry and Society, Everyday Chemical Analysis, Computational Chemistry, and Climate Change.

Chemical Product Design

This course provides a product design algorithm that can facilitate design and development of new or improved products. The design process emphasizes the concepts of sustainability, and discusses the impact of products, specifically chemical products on the community. Product design is discussed from the social, cultural and environmental perspectives, whereby the need for technology development for the social good becomes key.

Technology and Society

Technology and Society examines connections between the history of technology and other aspects of human history. The course uses historical episodes to challenge widely held misperceptions about technology and how it operates in the modern world. I argue that technology is a human product, not an autonomous force. Technology makes nothing happen by itself, but only as the result of human action. People can choose to design and use technology in different ways to better serve human needs.

Vertically Integrated Project: Engineering for Social Innovation

This course is part of the Vertically Integrated Projects program, where students get credit for working on ongoing projects over multiple semesters. The Engineering for Social Innovation VIP team teaches sustainability through hands-on projects that serve the global community. We begin with the community assets and then partner with community members to design solutions that meet pressing needs. As an example, one class project will focus on designing shoes from the natural resources available in rural Kenya. Another project will focus on solar power for homes in rural Haiti.​

Fundamentals and Challenges for a Sustainable Chemical Enterprise

In the chemical enterprise (industry, government and academia), chemists and engineers are involved in and are responsible for the development of new products, materials and manufacturing processes. These activities include developing manufacturing processes that are environmentally friendlier, safer for workers and society, and economically more sustainable. They participate in and contribute to all segments of the supply chain, from cradle to grave (nature back to nature).

Chemical Principles II Laboratory

The laboratory portion of this course focuses on foundational principles and essential techniques of chemistry.  These conceptual and technical tools have great relevance to many issues of importance to society, including climate change, human health, economic security, and more. SLS-related experiments in CHEM 1211K will be related to five threads of sustainability in chemistry: Green Chemistry, Chemistry and Society, Everyday Chemical Analysis, Computational Chemistry, and Climate Change.

Vertically Integrated Project: Configurable Computing and Embedded Systems

This course is part of the Vertically Integrated Projects program, a program where students get credit for working on ongoing projects over multiple semesters. This VIP course explores how embedded sensor and computing technology can be used to promote sustainability in a smart city framework.  The goal is to allow citizens to assess and monitor environmental conditions so that they are empowered to make wise decisions, effect change, and foster healthier, nurturing communities.

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