Technology for Social Good

Technology for Social Good

Technology for Social Good refers to the use of technology – broadly engineering, applied science and computing-based artifacts, algorithm and techniques – towards addressing pressing social problems. Technology is rarely, if ever, “the” solution, but instead works in concert with non-technology based approaches.

Nature, Governance, and Sustainability in Costa Rica

This study abroad program will provide a unique opportunity for students to learn and live in the tropics of Central America. Students will take two classes, BIOL 4813 Tropical Biology & Sustainability and PHIL 3127 Science, Technology, and Human Values, that will introduce students to biological, governmental, and societal interactions that help communities protect natural resources, preserve biological diversity, support local innovation, strengthen societal ties, and bolster human capital.

Technical Communication for Business Majors

After completing the first course module on personal branding, students will turn their attention to climate-related issues. Working in conjunction with several programs and initiatives both on and off campus, students will consider how climate-related issues affect us both as individuals and employees. For the second course module, students will select a Georgia-based company within the industry they hope to enter, or within which they are already working.

Freshman Seminar - Climate Change Focus

The Freshman Seminar course is designed to help students prepare for success in college and reflect on their values, academic plan, and career. Georgia Tech students interested in climate change will not find a clear pipeline from matriculation to graduation to develop skills and knowledge in this area. Our section of GT 1000 is designed to help students chart a course through Georgia Tech, however windy it might be, so that they emerge as climate-conscious citizens prepared to educate others and implement solutions.

Project Studio (Local Data Design Lab)

This course seeks to engage graduate students (and advanced undergraduates) from across Georgia Tech in exploring what Atlanta looks like through civic data. Today, data on the city are increasingly available. Micro and macro changes in the makeup of local neighborhoods can be tracked through demolition/construction permits, tax records, and community surveys, among other sources; all of which might be easily downloaded by anyone with an internet connection. But data can be available, without necessarily being accessible or actionable.

Principles of Interaction Design

In this course we will study and explore the principles and practices of interaction design. You will be introduced to a number of different techniques and tools for understanding particular interaction design challenges, you will develop scenarios and storyboards, create low-fidelity prototypes, and iterate on those prototypes to create a final design project.

Universal Design for Community Health: Health in the Built Environment

Universal Design in the Built Environment is a project-based, 3-credit course that explores the implications of human ability on the usability of places, products, interfaces, and systems for all individuals.  Course projects will engage students in solving real world problems through community-driven partnerships with the Georgia Farmers Markets Association and local markets.  Using a universal design approach, students will learn how to design for social impact and community health through a focus on local farmer's markets as a locus for social engagement, activity, and good

Urban and Regional Economics

In Urban Economics, Atlanta is an interesting city. It is one of the most segregated cities ethnically and economically. It is one of the most sprawled cities in the US. The unique features affect your life. Atlanta shows very low inter-generational income mobility. Drivers spend so much time stuck in traffic. We study urban economic theory to explain how the city characteristics affect your life.

Big Data and Public Policy

The School of Public Policy is offering a new cross-listed course with the School of Economics in Big Data and Public Policy. This course will provide an introduction to data science tools and methodologies for social science applications. Students will learn to conduct experiments and to identify causal mechanisms in large-scale social and administrative data. The course is targeted for Ph.D. or advanced M.S. students in Public Policy; M.S. students in Economics, and M.S. students in Cybersecurity

Data Science for Public Policy

Data Science for Public Policy introduces big data for social science and public policy applications. Students learn foundations of data science and learn to
conduct field experiments with an aim to solve social, environmental problems in major policy areas.

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