Spatiotemporal Relations

These tools correspond with the SLS Student Learning Outcomes

 

 

 

Big Idea Writeup

Spatiotemporal Relations

Having endorsed systems theory and systems analysis—and having recognized that all life exists and develops within complex, dynamic systems that are hybrids of human and natural processes, we must address scale problems if we are to understand sustainability.

Course

Landscape Ecology and Biogeography Using GIS

Why do plants and animals live where they do and how will they respond to increasing anthropogenic pressures? This course will explore scientific approaches to untangle the dynamic interactions between geologic features, human impacts, climate, and biodiversity. In it, we will use real data to examine the fundamental principles of landscape ecology and biogeography and their applications to conservation practices. The course will consist of 2 hours of lectures and 3 hours of lab per week.

Class, Power, and Inequality

In Class, Power, and Inequality, students will explore the causes and consequences of economic inequality in the United States and abroad. In particular, this course will help students understand why inequality between individuals and communities occurs, with major focuses on changes in the economy and social forces like politics, culture, and religion. Further, we pay particular attention to how gender and race/ethnicity shape economic inequality.

Class, Power, and Inequality

In Class, Power, and Inequality, students will explore the causes and consequences of economic inequality in the United States and abroad. In particular, this course will help students understand why inequality between individuals and communities occurs, with major focuses on changes in the economy and social forces like politics, culture, and religion. Further, we pay particular attention to how gender and race/ethnicity shape economic inequality.