Smart Cities

Smart Cities

The ‘smart city’ refers to the increasing role of new digital technologies in understanding and addressing an array of problems facing contemporary cities.

Smart Cities, Big Data, and the Matrix

Read  a reflection by Djuan Coleon, Executive Director of PURE (Project Urban Renewable Energy) on the recent SLS/INSS Conference: Smart, Connected Cities, as he writes about Smart Cities, Big Data, and the Matrix.

Big Data and Public Policy

The School of Public Policy is offering a new cross-listed course with the School of Economics in Big Data and Public Policy. This course will provide an introduction to data science tools and methodologies for social science applications. Students will learn to conduct experiments and to identify causal mechanisms in large-scale social and administrative data. The course is targeted for Ph.D. or advanced M.S. students in Public Policy; M.S. students in Economics, and M.S. students in Cybersecurity

Urban Sociology

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the field of urban sociology by exploring the history and current conditions of cities. This course will be geared toward viewing the city as a simultaneously social, cultural, and political economic phenomenon, with particular attention to the following: a) urbanization and the structure of cities; b) suburbanization; c) sustainable urban growth and economics; d) race and segregation; e) immigration; g) culture; h) gender and sexuality; i) gentrification and housing policy; j) environmental justice; and k) sustainable communities.

Data Science for Public Policy

Data Science for Public Policy introduces big data for social science and public policy applications. Students learn foundations of data science and learn to
conduct field experiments with an aim to solve social, environmental problems in major policy areas.

Urban and Regional Economics

In Urban Economics, Atlanta is an interesting city. It is one of the most segregated cities in terms of races and incomes. It is one of the most sprawled cities in the US. This unique features affect your life. For example, children from families at the 25th percentile income in Seattle, have economic outcomes comparable to children from families at the median in Atlanta (Raj et al. 2014). Why does Atlanta kids show this poor performance? We study urban economic theory about your life and city.

Virtually Remaking Cities

In addressing their sustainability agenda through design and construction, cities are subject to unique challenges, which requires effective exchange of knowledge and subject matter expertise among distributed project teams. At the same time, design and construction projects are dynamic and uncertain, requiring considerable coordination, communication and leadership to execute. Executing such projects in a virtual environment can offer many advantages and facilitate the design efforts. Yet, coordination, communication and leadership become increasingly difficult.

Urban Ecological Design

The course engages the contemporary issues of urban ecology and its articulation to design in urban settings. The new commitment of the co-habitation of nature and built environment has drawn attentions of city planners, urban designers and architects. The discourses of urban sustainability have to move away from social sufficiency, ecological efficiency to systems compatibility by linking the urban forms and ecological flows in urban, industrial and natural systems.

Sustainable Cities

This course is open to all undergraduate Civil and Environmental engineering majors. It will be taught in three parts. In Part I, the course will focus on providing a broad overview of how cities function by examining the various urban systems (e.g., transportation infrastructure, power supply, water distribution, buildings, etc.) and their interdependencies in relation to each other and to human and natural systems. This will be explored in the context of the role urban systems play in understanding and achieving urban sustainability.

Vertically Integrated Project: Civic Design

The purpose of this course is to research and develop information, communication, and media systems to address regional civic issues, using techniques from design, computing, and social sciences, in collaboration with government and community partners.  These systems will have real-world impact, and promote social sustainability, equity, and justice.

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