Shared Values

Shared Value

The concept of shared value recognizes that societal needs, not just conventional economic needs, define markets. It stipulates that the traditional approach to commercial value creation which ignores externalities is becoming outdated, and that businesses must reconnect company success with social progress.

Urban and Regional Economics

In Urban Economics, Atlanta is an interesting city. It is one of the most segregated cities ethnically and economically. It is one of the most sprawled cities in the US. The unique features affect your life. Atlanta shows very low inter-generational income mobility. Drivers spend so much time stuck in traffic. We study urban economic theory to explain how the city characteristics affect your life.

Poetics of Sustainability: Ecology & Immigration

This course will explore the intersections of ecology and immigration as urgent social, political, and environmental issues through the lens of poetry.

Women in Science Fiction

This course examines the heritage of women’s science fiction from Margaret Cavendish’s The Blazing World (1666) to Janelle Monáe’s 21st century Afrofuturist albums. Engaging such themes as racial segregation, gender identity, queer sexuality, and sustainability, the course will explore women who have used science fiction to comment on social inequities and propose avenues toward more sustainable, just worlds. These women thus assert the social justice stakes of imaginative futures.

France Today I (Sustainable Communities in France)

This course focuses on social, cultural, and scientific dimensions of sustainability and the concepts of identity, diversity, social equity and inclusion/exclusion in the French context. The course includes field work and group research projects.

Field Work Abroad (Local Sustainability Practices)

NOTE: This course is taught at Georgia Tech Lorraine (GTL) in Metz, France.

Career Success II

This course is focused on providing students opportunities to develop and reinforce tools and techniques to successfully become employed and maintain employment. Through this course, students will engage in internship opportunities on and off-campus that align with their career interests. Partnerships are created with university departments and independent organizations to facilitate the learning objectives and foster an inclusive learning environment. Class participants will learn the benefits of work, both for themselves and their contribution to society and the business community.

Food Literacy of Atlanta

In the past decade Atlanta has undergone phenomenal changes in infrastructure, and food culture because of two things: being a beta-hub in the tech industry, and tax credits that have cultivated a thriving film industry. This influx of people, money, and innovation, restaurant culture has seen tremendous growth. This Serve-Learn-Sustain (SLS) course encourages students to learn the story of Atlanta through its food history.

The Rhetorics and Poetics of Dirt

This course asks students to examine what we talk about when we talk about “dirt,” and how do the things we communicate about dirt change its presence in our lives. The major assignments facilitate learning goals through four units: dirt vs. soil, earthworks, dirt stories, and trendy dirt. The primary texts in this course will largely deal with a North American perspective on dirt. We will engage with American film (ex: Grapes of Wrath, Waterworld, Noma, Interstellar, The Martian, the Mad Max megaverse), and contemporary American literature.

Scientific Foundations of Health

This section of Scientific Foundations of Health will focus on community interactions to promote a more healthy, sustainable future.  Projects will focus on bringing awareness and developing both short, and long-term solutions to health issues impacting the Georgia Tech and Greater Atlanta community.

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