Prototyping

Prototyping

Prototyping is the activity of creating partial models of an artifact or system. It is foundational to design and engineering. There are three features of prototyping: 1) the models are incomplete 2) the models are used for communicating or testing ideas 3) the process is iterative, lessons learned from a prototype are implemented in the next prototype, gradually increasing the fidelity of the model.

Prototyping Practices for Innovation

Prototypes are typically thought of as nearly complete products or technologies which are used to conduct system, alpha or beta testing near the end of a development process. This course is designed to expand on the idea of prototyping and teach how to employ a variety of tools as methods to inspire, contextualize, evaluate and inform any phase of any research or development activity.

HumaniTech - VIP

GT faculty are working on a range of ongoing and exploratory humanitarian research topics. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to this research and get them involved to help advance the work. The studio class is team-based and students will work with GT faculty, other university faculty, NGOs and others depending on project needs.

Vertically Integrated Project: Civic Design

The purpose of this course is to research and develop information, communication, and media systems to address regional civic issues, using techniques from design, computing, and social sciences, in collaboration with government and community partners.  These systems will have real-world impact, and promote social sustainability, equity, and justice.

Psychology Research Methods for HCI

How do you know what a user wants to see on a wearable display, whether an app feature is being used, whether a clickable button is better than a swipe, or whether a person who is blind can use your physical product? Research methods for HCI allow you to investigate such questions and develop evidence to inform design decisions. In this course, you will learn about common methods employed in user-centered and evidence-based design. You will also learn how to choose methods, plan studies, and perform research that is inclusive of users with a range of abilities. 

Maker Culture and Sustainable Transportation: A Case Study (GT Mechanical Engineering)

While recycling is a time-honored tradition of the environmentally-conscious, an equally powerful way to build sustainable communities is by learning to reuse and repair damaged materials. Maker culture, a version of DIY culture that delights in creation and repair, offers a model for sustainability. In this case study, follow the adventures of GT student Buzz as he sets out to repair his bike using two Georgia Tech Maker Spaces: The Starter Bikes bike repair cooperative, and the Invention Studio. By learning how to restore his bike, Buzz empowers himself to live a sustainable life in another important way: as a bike commuter. Read on to consider the intersections of maker culture and sustainable transportation.

This tool was contributed by Arkadeep Kumar, Bob Myers, and Bethany Jacobs.

Urban Farming & Community Gardens

Starting a community garden in an abandoned vacant lot is a good way to address blight in a neighborhood. This project builds on the dataset of Westside Atlanta property surveys and walks the students through the process of starting a community garden to selling its produce on farmers markets. It emphasizes the social aspect of community building and the importance of buying local.

Rodent Control

This is a collection of assignments around the problem of rodent infestation in cities, which has become a pressing problem following the mild winters in 2015-16. The assignments are designed to 1) develop mapping and data analysis skills, 2) give meaningful ideas for application prototyping, and 3) foster thinking about community engagement. This is based on an up-to-date (2017) dataset of rat sightings in New York City and an on-going collaboration between Georgia Tech and the community of English Avenue.