Participatory Research

Participatory Research

Participatory Research starts from the principle of research with, not research for. In practice this means working closely with community partners to co-develop a research program, one that reflects the capacities and abilities of community members involved in the project and GT students and faculty.

Technical Communication for Business Majors

After completing the first course module on personal branding, students will turn their attention to climate-related issues. Working in conjunction with several programs and initiatives both on and off campus, students will consider how climate-related issues affect us both as individuals and employees. For the second course module, students will select a Georgia-based company within the industry they hope to enter, or within which they are already working.

Principles of Interaction Design

In this course we will study and explore the principles and practices of interaction design. You will be introduced to a number of different techniques and tools for understanding particular interaction design challenges, you will develop scenarios and storyboards, create low-fidelity prototypes, and iterate on those prototypes to create a final design project.

Universal Design for Community Health: Health in the Built Environment

Universal Design in the Built Environment is a project-based, 3-credit course that explores the implications of human ability on the usability of places, products, interfaces, and systems for all individuals.  Course projects will engage students in solving real world problems through community-driven partnerships with the Georgia Farmers Markets Association and local markets.  Using a universal design approach, students will learn how to design for social impact and community health through a focus on local farmer's markets as a locus for social engagement, activity, and good

Big Data and Public Policy

The School of Public Policy is offering a new cross-listed course with the School of Economics in Big Data and Public Policy. This course will provide an introduction to data science tools and methodologies for social science applications. Students will learn to conduct experiments and to identify causal mechanisms in large-scale social and administrative data. The course is targeted for Ph.D. or advanced M.S. students in Public Policy; M.S. students in Economics, and M.S. students in Cybersecurity

Food Literacy of Atlanta

In the past decade Atlanta has undergone phenomenal changes in infrastructure, and food culture because of two things: being a beta-hub in the tech industry, and tax credits that have cultivated a thriving film industry. This influx of people, money, and innovation, restaurant culture has seen tremendous growth. This Serve-Learn-Sustain (SLS) course encourages students to learn the story of Atlanta through its food history.

Sound Poetics x Sound Politics

Building on the multimedia strategies of composition and process students begin to develop in ENGL 1101, this course in multimedia rhetoric examines the influence of sound on experiences of belonging and access in the spaces we occupy and travel through, from the immediate environs of Georgia Tech to public spaces and sites of development throughout Atlanta.  An initial unit builds a vocabulary for recognizing and analyzing sounds in what R.

Sociology of Medicine and Health

This course will introduce the sociology of medicine and health (also known as medical sociology or sociology of health and illness), which is a broad field examining the social production of health, wellness, illness and mortality. This sub-discipline of sociology starts from the assumption that we cannot understand the topics of health and illness simply by looking at biological phenomena and medical knowledge.

Vertically Integrated Project: Civic Data and Design

The purpose of this course is to research and develop information, communication, and media systems to address regional civic issues, using techniques from design, computing, and social sciences, in collaboration with government and community partners.  These systems will have real-world impact, and promote social sustainability, equity, and justice.

Psychology Research Methods for HCI

How do you know what a user wants to see on a wearable display, whether an app feature is being used, whether a clickable button is better than a swipe, or whether a person who is blind can use your physical product? Research methods for HCI allow you to investigate such questions and develop evidence to inform design decisions. In this course, you will learn about common methods employed in user-centered and evidence-based design. You will also learn how to choose methods, plan studies, and perform research that is inclusive of users with a range of abilities. 

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