Interconnectedness

These tools correspond with the SLS Student Learning Outcomes


Big Idea Writeup

Interconnectedness

“Interconnectedness” in ecology generally has to do with the network structure that describes how different species interact. For instance, a food web is a network that describes connectedness between species, where each connection (or link) represents the transfer of energy and/or nutrients between a predator and its prey.

Course

Proctor Creek Wildlife Assessment Course

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is collaborating with Georgia Tech's College of Sciences and Serve-Learn-Sustain Program to create a summer course that introduces students to ecological monitoring techniques through collecting wildlife data within the Proctor Creek watershed. Located less than a mile from Georgia Tech's campus, the historic Proctor Creek neighborhood has been the focus of a community-led effort to restore streams within the watershed.

ENGL 1102: "We Understand Them, Do We Not?" Narrative and Empathy in Fictional Form(s)

The world we live in requires us to understand others who are very different from us; in many cases, our future (and lives) depends upon it. Scholars in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have recently argued that reading literary fiction can improve our empathetic understanding of other people. Literary fiction can arguably be a bridge between ourselves and the minds, intentions, and thoughts of others. This 1102 course will focus on how literary fiction engages our empathetic understanding of the world and others.

Class, Power, and Inequality

In Class, Power, and Inequality, students will explore the causes and consequences of economic inequality in the United States and abroad. In particular, this course will help students understand why inequality between individuals and communities occurs, with major focuses on changes in the economy and social forces like politics, culture, and religion. Further, we pay particular attention to how gender and race/ethnicity shape economic inequality.

Class, Power, and Inequality

In Class, Power, and Inequality, students will explore the causes and consequences of economic inequality in the United States and abroad. In particular, this course will help students understand why inequality between individuals and communities occurs, with major focuses on changes in the economy and social forces like politics, culture, and religion. Further, we pay particular attention to how gender and race/ethnicity shape economic inequality.