Infrastructure: Physical, Technological, Social

Infrastructure: Physical, Technological, Social

An infrastructure is defined in NSF Critical Resilient Interdependent Infrastructure Systems and Processes (CRISP), "as a network of human-made systems and processes that function cooperatively and synergistically to produce and distribute a continuous flow of essential goods and services."

Sustainability in American Literary Regionalism

In this section of English 1102, students will read and analyze novels, short stories, and movies grouped together under the genre of American literary regionalism. These texts, created between 1880 and 1950, are concerned with American small towns and rural areas, agriculture and farming science, and community health and development. We will investigate how an earlier generation of writers represented concepts of sustainability and equitability, and how these representations compare to modern-day writing on the same topics.

Environmental Justice in Global Literature and Media

Students in this course learn about how communities in diverse parts of the world are meeting the challenges posed by unsustainable development and environmental degradation.

Imagining the City

In this first year writing and communication course you will consider how your work at Tech and after Tech may interact with and affect urban communities and the people who live in them. We will begin by examining our own backgrounds--whether you're a life long city dweller or whether you grew up in a rural or suburban area--and how they have shaped our attitudes toward Atlanta and toward cities generally. These backgrounds, we will see, may condition our attitudes toward the development of urban space.

Immoral Energy: Slavery and Fossil Fuels in the Anthropocene

Energy systems are permeated with political and ethical questions, and no historical system demonstrates that as well as transatlantic slavery. Before fossil fuels, the bodies and labor of enslaved peoples powered trade. While at first slavery helped support the expansion of fossil fuels, eventually fossil fuels replaced slavery. This course will explore the ethical/moral valences of energy systems through a juxtaposition of transatlantic slavery and modern fossil fuels. The first half of the class will focus on the abolition debate.

Civil Engineering Systems

In CEE 3000, we learn about civil engineering systems and how to apply the systems approach and a sustainable engineering approach to planning, design, implementation, operation and renewal of systems. Per the Civil Engineering Code of Ethics, the concept of sustainability is the operating paradigm for making decisions across the life cycle of civil engineered facilities. A primary goal of the course is the expand the way we think about civil infrastructure systems from primarily physical to sociotechnical.

Technical Communication for Business Majors

After completing the first course module on personal branding, students will turn their attention to climate-related issues. Working in conjunction with several programs and initiatives both on and off campus, students will consider how climate-related issues affect us both as individuals and employees. For the second course module, students will select a Georgia-based company within the industry they hope to enter, or within which they are already working.

Sustainable Cities Studio

In this course, we partner with Central Atlanta Progress, who recently completed the Downtown Atlanta Master Plan (https://www.atlantadowntown.com/initiatives/master-plan), focusing specifically on the goals outlined in chapter 5 regarding restoration of the urban forest downtown and enhancing green infrastructure. Students will break into disciplinary teams to accomplish two goals: 1. Compile or create evidence to support the planning goals and their outcomes outlined in chapter 5, and 2. Identify opportunities and implementation strategies to enhance green infrastructure downtown.

Big Data and Public Policy

The School of Public Policy is offering a new cross-listed course with the School of Economics in Big Data and Public Policy. This course will provide an introduction to data science tools and methodologies for social science applications. Students will learn to conduct experiments and to identify causal mechanisms in large-scale social and administrative data. The course is targeted for Ph.D. or advanced M.S. students in Public Policy; M.S. students in Economics, and M.S. students in Cybersecurity

Data Science for Public Policy

Data Science for Public Policy introduces big data for social science and public policy applications. Students learn foundations of data science and learn to
conduct field experiments with an aim to solve social, environmental problems in major policy areas.

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