Information Visualization

Information Visualization

We are in a data and information rich epoch, yet the sheer amount of information can be both overwhelming and difficult to verify. Information visualization provides a path to better understand unique characteristics within large data sets, as well as communicate complex scientific phenomena such as the impact of global warming.

Technical Communication: The Problem of Water

The technical communication classroom is not just a laboratory space for professional training; it is also a laboratory space for developing the necessary skills to become a responsible citizen (Blake Scott 294). This summer’s experiences should transform you into a more effective communicator who is more aware of the ways that technical communication can be used in both the workplace and the community as a whole. Technical Communication involves working with a variety of stakeholders to utilize and relay information in multiple forms.

Poetics of Sustainability: Ecology & Immigration

This course will explore the intersections of ecology and immigration as urgent social, political, and environmental issues through the lens of poetry.

Curating Safe Space: LIVE WORK LEARN PLAY GROW

In partnership with The Pride School Atlanta, this course explores advocacy through the design of space at three scales of architecture (in this case, as the design of building): interior space, the building, and the landscape. Can architects re-imagine the future of educational spaces and social equity by placing attention to the bidirectional relationships of space and behavior within the context of gender equality and human rights? Can advocacy become a mainstream practice, a political voice, for architects?

Prototyping Practices for Innovation

Prototypes are typically thought of as nearly complete products or technologies which are used to conduct system, alpha or beta testing near the end of a development process. This course is designed to expand on the idea of prototyping and teach how to employ a variety of tools as methods to inspire, contextualize, evaluate and inform any phase of any research or development activity.

Comics and Civic Engagement

In this course, students will create research-based comics about a topic related to urban development, particularly in relationship to Atlanta’s underserved West Side neighborhood.  They will then present these comics at an on campus exhibition with the goal of raising awareness about the issues and assets of the West Side. While comics may seem an odd fit for serious issues, many organizations--from the UN to the Alzheimer's Association--and authors have begun using them to explore and educate on such topics as climate change, medical issues, and violence against women.

Biodiversity Dynamics

Biodiversity Dynamics will be a project-based course will explore where plants and animals live on the landscape, and how and why they move or evolve in response to environmental changes and human impacts. We will use real species, landscape, climate, and human impact data to explore biogeographic rules, such as the latitudinal & elevation diversity gradients. We will also learn about how landscape ecologists use species distribution models and corridor models for conservation purposes.

Making the List: Banned Books, Best Sellers, and Best Of

What makes a book a success? In this writing course, we will examine three measures of book quality: literary prizes, bestseller lists, and the banned book list. The course will include projects that enhance written, oral, visual, electronic and nonverbal (WOVEN) communication skills while honing students’ ability to think and talk critically about literature, culture, and consumer habits within a wide variety of reading communities and other audiences.

English Service Learning for Sustainable Futures

This English language course will explore and create solutions toward a Sustainable Future for cities here and around the world. Our local focus will be Atlanta, where we hear speakers, read about, and visit examples of sustainable solutions in food and energy. Then, we will work in teams to teach and demonstrate an example of sustainability to the ones most likely to carry it out: kids. We will incorporate their perspectives in our activities. Throughout, students will reflect in writing and speaking and receive support to improve academic and professional English fluency. 

Vertically Integrated Project: Civic Design

The purpose of this course is to research and develop information, communication, and media systems to address regional civic issues, using techniques from design, computing, and social sciences, in collaboration with government and community partners.  These systems will have real-world impact, and promote social sustainability, equity, and justice.

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