Inequality, Poverty and Sustainable Development

Big Idea Writeup

Inequality, Poverty and Sustainable Development

In September 2015, the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development was adopted at the United Nations Sustainable Development Summit. This Agenda is a plan of action for people, planet and prosperity. It recognizes that eradicating poverty in all its forms and dimensions, including extreme poverty, is the greatest global challenge and an indispensable requirement for sustainable development.

Course

The Rhetorics and Poetics of Dirt

This course asks students to examine what we talk about when we talk about “dirt,” and how do the things we communicate about dirt change its presence in our lives. The major assignments facilitate learning goals through four units: dirt vs. soil, earthworks, dirt stories, and trendy dirt. The primary texts in this course will largely deal with a North American perspective on dirt. We will engage with American film (ex: Grapes of Wrath, Waterworld, Noma, Interstellar, The Martian, the Mad Max megaverse), and contemporary American literature.

Sustainability, Technology, and Policy

This course - taught on the Pacific Program - will develop a theoretical understanding of sustainability, from a bottom-up perspective that considers ecological outcomes as a function of human institutions. It begins with defining and understanding the tragedy of the commons, and develops an understanding of why we might not be doomed to this tragedy. While exploring broad themes in environmental ethics, philosophy, and management, it will explore cases in the Pacific context, and will include a service-learning project in Fiji.

Social Issues and Public Policy

This course focuses on social issues associated with contemporary American society. While the United States has many benefits and is a nation that many admire, there are several social problems that are misaligned with American values. More specifically, it takes a critical sociological perspective in analyzing U.S. capitalism and its impact on our social institutions, social inequalities, and the quality of our democracy. We particularly focus on comparisons of the U.S. with other affluent, market-based democratic countries in order to understand the uniqueness of American capitalism.

Introduction to Global Development

This course introduces students to the history, theory and practice of international development. Students will examine the different meanings and objectives of global development, paying particular attention to economic growth, poverty alleviation, inequality reduction, capability enhancement, the defense of human rights and sustainability.

Introduction to Global Development

This course introduces students to the history, theory and practice of international development. Students will examine the different meanings and objectives of global development, paying particular attention to economic growth, poverty alleviation, inequality reduction, capability enhancement, the defense of human rights and sustainability.

Class, Power, and Inequality

In Class, Power, and Inequality, students will explore the causes and consequences of economic inequality in the United States and abroad. In particular, this course will help students understand why inequality between individuals and communities occurs, with major focuses on changes in the economy and social forces like politics, culture, and religion. Further, we pay particular attention to how gender and race/ethnicity shape economic inequality.

Class, Power, and Inequality

In Class, Power, and Inequality, students will explore the causes and consequences of economic inequality in the United States and abroad. In particular, this course will help students understand why inequality between individuals and communities occurs, with major focuses on changes in the economy and social forces like politics, culture, and religion. Further, we pay particular attention to how gender and race/ethnicity shape economic inequality.

Development Economics

This is a graduate course on development economics. The course will cover a wide range of topics including how communities differ in terms of: economic growth, poverty, inequality, and human development. The course will help students understand what do we mean by sustainable development, what are the problems in achieving it and how can we overcome those problems.

Documentary Film

 Documentaries help shed light on significant topics, and challenge their audiences to act on relevant issues of the day.  The objectives of this course are to introduce students to the art of documentary filmmaking, and to explore the ways in which documentary filmmaking can serve as a catalyst for articulating social justice issues that prompt audiences to take action.

Pages