Food-Energy-Water Nexus

These tools correspond with the SLS Student Learning Outcomes

 

 

 

Big Idea Writeup

Food-Energy-Water Nexus

FEW systems can be define very broadly, according to the National Science Foundation "incorporating physical processes (such as new technologies for more efficient resource utilization), natural processes (such as biogeochemical and hydrologic cycles), biological processes (such as agroecosystem structure and productivity), social/behavioral processes (such as decision making and governance), and cyber elements."

Blog Article

Reflections on the Fall 2016 SLS Food, Energy, Water Systems (FEWS) Fellows Program

Promoting Interdisciplinarity, Openness, and Engagement by Carl DiSalvo

On the Difficult, Necessary Work of Leaving the Silo: Avoiding Unintended Consequences by Joe Brown (see below)

Course

Numerical Methods in Chemical Engineering

Many engineering problems require the use of advanced numerical methods for finding solutions to systems of linear, nonlinear, and differential equations, optimizing functions, and analyzing data. The general objectives of this course are to develop skills in properly defining and setting up chemical engineering problems and learning numerical methods that can be used to solve these problems. For this reason, this course provides a foundation of techniques that can be used to solve practical and complex engineering problems.

Electrochemical Energy Storage and Conversion

Energy sustainability determines the suitability of the communities and the whole global society. The course will teach students the concepts in electrochemical energy storage and conversion and the working mechanisms and applications of a number of popular energy storage devices such as rechargeable batteries, supercapacitors and fuel cells. The application of such energy storage technologies can promote the use of clean energy sources and improve energy efficiency.