Food-Energy-Water Nexus

Food-Energy-Water Nexus

FEW systems can be define very broadly, according to the National Science Foundation "incorporating physical processes (such as new technologies for more efficient resource utilization), natural processes (such as biogeochemical and hydrologic cycles), biological processes (such as agroecosystem structure and productivity), social/behavioral processes (such as decision making and governance), and cyber elements."

Reflections on the Fall 2016 SLS Food, Energy, Water Systems (FEWS) Fellows Program

Promoting Interdisciplinarity, Openness, and Engagement by Carl DiSalvo

On the Difficult, Necessary Work of Leaving the Silo: Avoiding Unintended Consequences by Joe Brown (see below)

Energy Policy and Markets

The class will introduce students to energy technologies, with specific regards to markets and policy. The objective of the course is to provide the economist’s perspective on a broad range of topics that professionals in the energy industry will encounter.

Food Literacy of Atlanta

In the past decade Atlanta has undergone phenomenal changes in infrastructure, and food culture because of two things: being a beta-hub in the tech industry, and tax credits that have cultivated a thriving film industry. This influx of people, money, and innovation, restaurant culture has seen tremendous growth. This Serve-Learn-Sustain (SLS) course encourages students to learn the story of Atlanta through its food history.

Chemical Principles I Laboratory

The laboratory portion of this course focuses on foundational principles and essential techniques of chemistry. These conceptual and technical tools have great relevance to many issues of importance to society, including climate change, human health, economic security, and more. SLS-related experiments in CHEM 1211K will be related to five threads of sustainability in chemistry: Green Chemistry, Chemistry and Society, Everyday Chemical Analysis, Computational Chemistry, and Climate Change.

The Rhetorics and Poetics of Dirt

This course asks students to examine what we talk about when we talk about “dirt,” and how do the things we communicate about dirt change its presence in our lives. The major assignments facilitate learning goals through four units: dirt vs. soil, earthworks, dirt stories, and trendy dirt. The primary texts in this course will largely deal with a North American perspective on dirt. We will engage with American film (ex: Grapes of Wrath, Waterworld, Noma, Interstellar, The Martian, the Mad Max megaverse), and contemporary American literature.

Numerical Methods in Chemical Engineering

Many engineering problems require the use of advanced numerical methods for finding solutions to systems of linear, nonlinear, and differential equations, optimizing functions, and analyzing data. The general objectives of this course are to develop skills in properly defining and setting up chemical engineering problems and learning numerical methods that can be used to solve these problems. For this reason, this course provides a foundation of techniques that can be used to solve practical and complex engineering problems.

English Service Learning for Sustainable Futures

This English language course will explore and create solutions toward a Sustainable Future for cities here and around the world. Our local focus will be Atlanta, where we hear speakers, read about, and visit examples of sustainable solutions in food and energy. Then, we will work in teams to teach and demonstrate an example of sustainability to the ones most likely to carry it out: kids. We will incorporate their perspectives in our activities. Throughout, students will reflect in writing and speaking and receive support to improve academic and professional English fluency. 

Electrochemical Energy Storage and Conversion

Energy sustainability determines the suitability of the communities and the whole global society. The course will teach students the concepts in electrochemical energy storage and conversion and the working mechanisms and applications of a number of popular energy storage devices such as rechargeable batteries, supercapacitors and fuel cells. The application of such energy storage technologies can promote the use of clean energy sources and improve energy efficiency.

Chemical Principles II

This Honors Program section of Chemical Principles II differs from traditional large lectures in two key areas: First, core chemical concepts are introduced by considering "big questions" in chemistry, typically pertaining to the challenge of powering the planet with clean energy. For instance, how do catalytic converters mitigating transportation emissions, and what are the impacts on pricing and availability of precious metals?

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