Equity and Climate

Equity and Climate

One does not automatically connect climate change with concerns about equity and social justice. However, when one begins to think about the global and long-term dimensions of climate change as well as the asymmetry of benefits and costs of climate mitigation actions spatially and temporally, the connections become obvious.

Technical Communication for Business Majors

After completing the first course module on personal branding, students will turn their attention to climate-related issues. Working in conjunction with several programs and initiatives both on and off campus, students will consider how climate-related issues affect us both as individuals and employees. For the second course module, students will select a Georgia-based company within the industry they hope to enter, or within which they are already working.

Cultures of Waste: Disease and Environment

This course explores literary and cultural representations of bodily and industrial waste alongside wasting diseases to explore how the nineteenth century produced ideas about waste that continue to influence contemporary work in the fields of epidemiology, civil engineering, public health, environmental science, and medicine.

Freshman Seminar - Climate Change Focus

The Freshman Seminar course is designed to help students prepare for success in college and reflect on their values, academic plan, and career. Georgia Tech students interested in climate change will not find a clear pipeline from matriculation to graduation to develop skills and knowledge in this area. Our section of GT 1000 is designed to help students chart a course through Georgia Tech, however windy it might be, so that they emerge as climate-conscious citizens prepared to educate others and implement solutions.

Sustainable Cities Studio

In this course, we partner with Central Atlanta Progress, who recently completed the Downtown Atlanta Master Plan (https://www.atlantadowntown.com/initiatives/master-plan), focusing specifically on the goals outlined in chapter 5 regarding restoration of the urban forest downtown and enhancing green infrastructure. Students will break into disciplinary teams to accomplish two goals: 1. Compile or create evidence to support the planning goals and their outcomes outlined in chapter 5, and 2. Identify opportunities and implementation strategies to enhance green infrastructure downtown.

Introduction to Media Studies

How have contemporary media, such as comics, film, literature, video games, data visualization, and architecture, been used to shape popular conceptions of the environment, to challenge those conceptions and to propose radical alternatives? In this class, students will learn to analyze media representations of the earth, nature, sustainability, wildlife and wilderness in creative work across domains: a film by Hayao Miyazaki, a short story by Ursula K.

Women in Science Fiction

Women in Science Fiction studies women writers, artists, and musicians who use science fiction to propose and debate how we might make our world more sustainable. Engaging topics like race, gender, and the environment, these women craft futures that may sometimes appear fantastical or otherwise out of reach. However, this course asserts the real-world stakes of its subject matter for Georgia Tech students. Our readings will spur discussions and assignments about today’s sustainability challenges. This will include an exciting partnership with Prof.

Urban Sociology

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the field of urban sociology by exploring the history and current conditions of cities. This course will be geared toward viewing the city as a simultaneously social, cultural, and political economic phenomenon, with particular attention to the following: a) urbanization and the structure of cities; b) suburbanization; c) sustainable urban growth and economics; d) race and segregation; e) immigration; g) culture; h) gender and sexuality; i) gentrification and housing policy; j) environmental justice; and k) sustainable communities.

Chemical Principles I Laboratory

The laboratory portion of this course focuses on foundational principles and essential techniques of chemistry. These conceptual and technical tools have great relevance to many issues of importance to society, including climate change, human health, economic security, and more. SLS-related experiments in CHEM 1211K will be related to five threads of sustainability in chemistry: Green Chemistry, Chemistry and Society, Everyday Chemical Analysis, Computational Chemistry, and Climate Change.

Prototyping Practices for Innovation

Prototypes are typically thought of as nearly complete products or technologies which are used to conduct system, alpha or beta testing near the end of a development process. This course is designed to expand on the idea of prototyping and teach how to employ a variety of tools as methods to inspire, contextualize, evaluate and inform any phase of any research or development activity.

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