Cultural, Linguistic, and Biological Diversity

Species biodiversity

Species biodiversity is a fundamental aspect of the structure and function of natural communities. It reflects both the number of species in a community and the relative abundance of those species; more species and more equitable abundance of the species increase diversity.

Sustainability

Sustainability provides a set of analytical and normative frameworks to understand and overcome the challenges of the 21st Century, such as extreme poverty, climate change, and social inequality.

Intersections of Biological Diversity and Cultural Diversity

There is a growing transdisciplinary field that investigates the links between the world’s cultural, linguistic, and biological diversity. By rejecting the separation between nature and culture, this field of study examines the various threats on diversity for both humanity and the earth

Inclusive Excellence

Social justice on campus requires working toward inclusive excellence in all aspects of university. 

Standing Peachtree and Indigenous New Media

Indigenous knowledges and stories are mapped onto the land beneath your feet and mediated through oral and material modes. Indigenous knowledges and stories continue to be sovereign, embodied through various methods of meaning-making. This course focuses on the rhetorical practices of Native/American Indian communities and how those practices “make” meaning within indigenous communities.

Cultures of Waste: Disease and Environment

This course explores literary and cultural representations of bodily and industrial waste alongside wasting diseases to explore how the nineteenth century produced ideas about waste that continue to influence contemporary work in the fields of epidemiology, civil engineering, public health, environmental science, and medicine.

The Outbreak Narrative

In "The Outbreak Narrative" will explore communication via our class topic: narratives of contagion. As defined by Priscilla Wald, author of Contagious: Cultures, Carriers, and the Outbreak Narrative, “the outbreak narrative—in its scientific, journalistic, and fictional incantations—follows a formulaic plot that begins with the identification of an emerging infection, includes discussion of the global networks through which it travels, and chronicles the epidemiological work that ends with its containment” (2).

Food Literacy of Atlanta

In the past decade Atlanta has undergone phenomenal changes in infrastructure, and food culture because of two things: being a beta-hub in the tech industry, and tax credits that have cultivated a thriving film industry. This influx of people, money, and innovation, restaurant culture has seen tremendous growth. This Serve-Learn-Sustain (SLS) course encourages students to learn the story of Atlanta through its food history.

Sound Poetics x Sound Politics

Building on the multimedia strategies of composition and process students begin to develop in ENGL 1101, this course in multimedia rhetoric examines the influence of sound on experiences of belonging and access in the spaces we occupy and travel through, from the immediate environs of Georgia Tech to public spaces and sites of development throughout Atlanta.  An initial unit builds a vocabulary for recognizing and analyzing sounds in what R.

The Rhetorics and Poetics of Dirt

This course asks students to examine what we talk about when we talk about “dirt,” and how do the things we communicate about dirt change its presence in our lives. The major assignments facilitate learning goals through four units: dirt vs. soil, earthworks, dirt stories, and trendy dirt. The primary texts in this course will largely deal with a North American perspective on dirt. We will engage with American film (ex: Grapes of Wrath, Waterworld, Noma, Interstellar, The Martian, the Mad Max megaverse), and contemporary American literature.

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