Collaborative Problem-Solving

Collaborative Problem-Solving

Collaborative problem-solving (CPS) simply means that multiple stakeholders agree to work together to address community concerns. The CPS model provides a systematic approach for communities to build partnerships with other stakeholders as they address their challenges.

GT 1000 SLS

This GT 1000 course is focused on Equitable & Sustainable Development as part of the Sustainable Communities summer session track.  Student will learn to evaluate how decisions impact the sustainability of communities.

Urban and Regional Economics

In Urban Economics, Atlanta is an interesting city. It is one of the most segregated cities ethnically and economically. It is one of the most sprawled cities in the US. The unique features affect your life. Atlanta shows very low inter-generational income mobility. Drivers spend so much time stuck in traffic. We study urban economic theory to explain how the city characteristics affect your life.

Technical Communication: The Problem of Water

The technical communication classroom is not just a laboratory space for professional training; it is also a laboratory space for developing the necessary skills to become a responsible citizen (Blake Scott 294). This summer’s experiences should transform you into a more effective communicator who is more aware of the ways that technical communication can be used in both the workplace and the community as a whole. Technical Communication involves working with a variety of stakeholders to utilize and relay information in multiple forms.

Poetics of Sustainability: Ecology & Immigration

This course will explore the intersections of ecology and immigration as urgent social, political, and environmental issues through the lens of poetry.

Women in Science Fiction

This course examines the heritage of women’s science fiction from Margaret Cavendish’s The Blazing World (1666) to Janelle Monáe’s 21st century Afrofuturist albums. Engaging such themes as racial segregation, gender identity, queer sexuality, and sustainability, the course will explore women who have used science fiction to comment on social inequities and propose avenues toward more sustainable, just worlds. These women thus assert the social justice stakes of imaginative futures.

France Today I (Sustainable Communities in France)

This course focuses on social, cultural, and scientific dimensions of sustainability and the concepts of identity, diversity, social equity and inclusion/exclusion in the French context. The course includes field work and group research projects.

Field Work Abroad (Local Sustainability Practices)

NOTE: This course is taught at Georgia Tech Lorraine (GTL) in Metz, France.

Curating Safe Space: LIVE WORK LEARN PLAY GROW

In partnership with The Pride School Atlanta, this course explores advocacy through the design of space at three scales of architecture (in this case, as the design of building): interior space, the building, and the landscape. Can architects re-imagine the future of educational spaces and social equity by placing attention to the bidirectional relationships of space and behavior within the context of gender equality and human rights? Can advocacy become a mainstream practice, a political voice, for architects?

The Rhetorics and Poetics of Dirt

This course asks students to examine what we talk about when we talk about “dirt,” and how do the things we communicate about dirt change its presence in our lives. The major assignments facilitate learning goals through four units: dirt vs. soil, earthworks, dirt stories, and trendy dirt. The primary texts in this course will largely deal with a North American perspective on dirt. We will engage with American film (ex: Grapes of Wrath, Waterworld, Noma, Interstellar, The Martian, the Mad Max megaverse), and contemporary American literature.

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