Collaborative Problem-Solving

Collaborative Problem-Solving

Collaborative problem-solving (CPS) simply means that multiple stakeholders agree to work together to address community concerns. The CPS model provides a systematic approach for communities to build partnerships with other stakeholders as they address their challenges.

Technical Communication for Business Majors

After completing the first course module on personal branding, students will turn their attention to climate-related issues. Working in conjunction with several programs and initiatives both on and off campus, students will consider how climate-related issues affect us both as individuals and employees. For the second course module, students will select a Georgia-based company within the industry they hope to enter, or within which they are already working.

Composing Access

Who has access to the university? In this course, you will consider how institutes of higher education have built barriers to access for disabled people and how disabled people have fought to remove them. Using Georgia Tech’s WOVEN curriculum, you will produce four artifacts aimed at identifying, discussing, and addressing many of those barriers at Georgia Tech. In so doing, you will develop skills in communication, rhetoric, and communication that will give you access to the conversations and work happening across the campus.

User Interface Design

This project-based course covers the process of designing high-quality user interfaces to computing systems. It walks teams step-by-step through the user-centered design process, resulting in novel UI designs that meet users' needs and even delight them. The class covers theories informing UI design and evaluation, reviews the state of the art in interaction and presentation techniques, including user input techniques and the state of the art in graphical, audio, and haptic feedback.

Sustainable Cities Studio

In this course, we partner with Central Atlanta Progress, who recently completed the Downtown Atlanta Master Plan (https://www.atlantadowntown.com/initiatives/master-plan), focusing specifically on the goals outlined in chapter 5 regarding restoration of the urban forest downtown and enhancing green infrastructure. Students will break into disciplinary teams to accomplish two goals: 1. Compile or create evidence to support the planning goals and their outcomes outlined in chapter 5, and 2. Identify opportunities and implementation strategies to enhance green infrastructure downtown.

GT 1000 SLS

This GT 1000 course is focused on Equitable & Sustainable Development as part of the Sustainable Communities summer session track.  Student will learn to evaluate how decisions impact the sustainability of communities.

Urban and Regional Economics

In Urban Economics, Atlanta is an interesting city. It is one of the most segregated cities ethnically and economically. It is one of the most sprawled cities in the US. The unique features affect your life. Atlanta shows very low inter-generational income mobility. Drivers spend so much time stuck in traffic. We study urban economic theory to explain how the city characteristics affect your life.

Technical Communication: The Problem of Water

The technical communication classroom is not just a laboratory space for professional training; it is also a laboratory space for developing the necessary skills to become a responsible citizen (Blake Scott 294). This summer’s experiences should transform you into a more effective communicator who is more aware of the ways that technical communication can be used in both the workplace and the community as a whole. Technical Communication involves working with a variety of stakeholders to utilize and relay information in multiple forms.

Poetics of Sustainability: Ecology & Immigration

This course will explore the intersections of ecology and immigration as urgent social, political, and environmental issues through the lens of poetry.

Women in Science Fiction

Women in Science Fiction studies women writers, artists, and musicians who use science fiction to propose and debate how we might make our world more sustainable. Engaging topics like race, gender, and the environment, these women craft futures that may sometimes appear fantastical or otherwise out of reach. However, this course asserts the real-world stakes of its subject matter for Georgia Tech students. Our readings will spur discussions and assignments about today’s sustainability challenges. This will include an exciting partnership with Prof.

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