Collaborative Community Innovations

Achieving the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals

The United Nations Sustainable Development Goals are a universal call to action to end poverty and hunger, improve health and education, make cities more sustainable, promote innovation, combat climate change, protect oceans and forests, and foster technological innovation.  Because of the interconnectedness of these goals, it will require the sort of multidisciplinary approach for which Georgia Tech is noted to achieve the targets they set.  In other words, this is a critically important space in which Georgia Tech can -- and should -- play an important role.

Technical Communication: The Problem of Water

The technical communication classroom is not just a laboratory space for professional training; it is also a laboratory space for developing the necessary skills to become a responsible citizen (Blake Scott 294). This summer’s experiences should transform you into a more effective communicator who is more aware of the ways that technical communication can be used in both the workplace and the community as a whole. Technical Communication involves working with a variety of stakeholders to utilize and relay information in multiple forms.

Food Literacy of Atlanta

In the past decade Atlanta has undergone phenomenal changes in infrastructure, and food culture because of two things: being a beta-hub in the tech industry, and tax credits that have cultivated a thriving film industry. This influx of people, money, and innovation, restaurant culture has seen tremendous growth. This Serve-Learn-Sustain (SLS) course encourages students to learn the story of Atlanta through its food history.

Curating Safe Space: LIVE WORK LEARN PLAY GROW

In partnership with The Pride School Atlanta, this course explores advocacy through the design of space at three scales of architecture (in this case, as the design of building): interior space, the building, and the landscape. Can architects re-imagine the future of educational spaces and social equity by placing attention to the bidirectional relationships of space and behavior within the context of gender equality and human rights? Can advocacy become a mainstream practice, a political voice, for architects?

The Rhetorics and Poetics of Dirt

This course asks students to examine what we talk about when we talk about “dirt,” and how do the things we communicate about dirt change its presence in our lives. The major assignments facilitate learning goals through four units: dirt vs. soil, earthworks, dirt stories, and trendy dirt. The primary texts in this course will largely deal with a North American perspective on dirt. We will engage with American film (ex: Grapes of Wrath, Waterworld, Noma, Interstellar, The Martian, the Mad Max megaverse), and contemporary American literature.

Sustainability, Technology, and Policy

This course - taught on the Pacific Program - will develop a theoretical understanding of sustainability, from a bottom-up perspective that considers ecological outcomes as a function of human institutions. It begins with defining and understanding the tragedy of the commons, and develops an understanding of why we might not be doomed to this tragedy. While exploring broad themes in environmental ethics, philosophy, and management, it will explore cases in the Pacific context, and will include a service-learning project in Fiji.

The History and Rhetoric of Science Writing for Children

Books for children, both fiction and non-fiction, can address scientific principles in creative ways in an attempt to educate, inform and excite young children. Hidden inside many classic children’s texts are broad scientific concepts like climate change (Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs), engineering (The Three Little Pigs), life cycles (The Very Hungry Caterpillar), and environmentalism (The Lorax).

Leadership Minor Capstone - Social Impact Organizations

This is a capstone style course where most of the learning will be generated through a project with a social sector (social enterprise or nonprofit) organization, and by attending the weekly IMPACT Speaker series talks.  The groundwork for understanding the opportunities and challenges of the social sector will be covered through readings, TED style videos, student-led class discussions, and by a site visit to a local nonprofit organization.

Jr/Sr Studio (Study Abroad Berlin)

Documentary Film

 Documentaries help shed light on significant topics, and challenge their audiences to act on relevant issues of the day.  The objectives of this course are to introduce students to the art of documentary filmmaking, and to explore the ways in which documentary filmmaking can serve as a catalyst for articulating social justice issues that prompt audiences to take action.

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