Cognitive Flexibility

Cognitive Flexibility

When I think of the intended goals or outcomes of the SLS program, the term cognitive flexibility comes to mind.

Career Success II

This course is focused on providing students opportunities to develop and reinforce tools and techniques to successfully become employed and maintain employment. Through this course, students will engage in internship opportunities on and off-campus that align with their career interests. Partnerships are created with university departments and independent organizations to facilitate the learning objectives and foster an inclusive learning environment. Class participants will learn the benefits of work, both for themselves and their contribution to society and the business community.

Prototyping Practices for Innovation

Prototypes are typically thought of as nearly complete products or technologies which are used to conduct system, alpha or beta testing near the end of a development process. This course is designed to expand on the idea of prototyping and teach how to employ a variety of tools as methods to inspire, contextualize, evaluate and inform any phase of any research or development activity.

The Rhetorics and Poetics of Dirt

This course asks students to examine what we talk about when we talk about “dirt,” and how do the things we communicate about dirt change its presence in our lives. The major assignments facilitate learning goals through four units: dirt vs. soil, earthworks, dirt stories, and trendy dirt. The primary texts in this course will largely deal with a North American perspective on dirt. We will engage with American film (ex: Grapes of Wrath, Waterworld, Noma, Interstellar, The Martian, the Mad Max megaverse), and contemporary American literature.

Collaborative Design

Collaborative Design is a course focused on inquiry-based learning in a project-based environment. Student teams will learn to work together creatively, in a hands-on environment, with emerging technologies to design innovative products or services. The course aims to teach design thinking as an approach that can be used to consider issues and resolve problems more broadly, and promote self-directed learning that can be applied inside and outside the classroom.

Collaborative Design

Collaborative Design is a course focused on inquiry-based learning in a project-based environment. Student teams will learn to work together creatively, in a hands-on environment, with emerging technologies to design innovative products or services. The course aims to teach design thinking as an approach that can be used to consider issues and resolve problems more broadly, and promote self-directed learning that can be applied inside and outside the classroom.

Psychology Research Methods for HCI

How do you know what a user wants to see on a wearable display, whether an app feature is being used, whether a clickable button is better than a swipe, or whether a person who is blind can use your physical product? Research methods for HCI allow you to investigate such questions and develop evidence to inform design decisions. In this course, you will learn about common methods employed in user-centered and evidence-based design. You will also learn how to choose methods, plan studies, and perform research that is inclusive of users with a range of abilities. 

Co-Curricular Reflection Tool

This tool provides instructors with a focused reflective activity that asks students to make connections between their course and a co-curricular experience. Reflection related to co-curricular events gives students time and space to critically examine their experience and understand its relevance to their learning in class. The reflection questions provided focus on sustainability, individual actions, and community engagement; they may be adapted as needed to suit individual course objectives.

SOLO Taxonomy

The SOLO (Structure of Observed Learning Outcomes) Taxonomy Rubric is a rubric adapted by Serve-Learn-Sustain to assess Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) developed to assess sustainability knowledge. The rubric can be adapted to assess any of the eight SLOs that instructors can use when partnering with SLS for their affiliated courses. 

This rubric is intended to be adaptable for each instructor’s use. Most projects or assignments will utilize three or four SLOs at most. Choose the SLOs that are most pertinent to your assignments or projects when utilizing this rubric.