Climate Change- BIG IDEA Coming Soon

Energy Policy and Markets

The class will introduce students to energy technologies, with specific regards to markets and policy. The objective of the course is to provide the economist’s perspective on a broad range of topics that professionals in the energy industry will encounter.

Big Data and Public Policy

The School of Public Policy is offering a new cross-listed course with the School of Economics in Big Data and Public Policy. This course will provide an introduction to data science tools and methodologies for social science applications. Students will learn to conduct experiments and to identify causal mechanisms in large-scale social and administrative data. The course is targeted for Ph.D. or advanced M.S. students in Public Policy; M.S. students in Economics, and M.S. students in Cybersecurity

Data Science for Public Policy

Data Science for Public Policy introduces big data for social science and public policy applications. Students learn foundations of data science and learn to
conduct field experiments with an aim to solve social, environmental problems in major policy areas.

History of Urban Form

Understanding cities, the largest and most complex artifacts in human history, is essential as we face the challenges of building a sustainable future. This course is taught from historical vantage points across the globe, recognizing that urban form is shaped by many influences - ecological, technological, cultural, political and economic.

Chemical Principles I Laboratory

The laboratory portion of this course focuses on foundational principles and essential techniques of chemistry. These conceptual and technical tools have great relevance to many issues of importance to society, including climate change, human health, economic security, and more. SLS-related experiments in CHEM 1211K will be related to five threads of sustainability in chemistry: Green Chemistry, Chemistry and Society, Everyday Chemical Analysis, Computational Chemistry, and Climate Change.

Biodiversity Dynamics

Biodiversity Dynamics will be a project-based course will explore where plants and animals live on the landscape, and how and why they move or evolve in response to environmental changes and human impacts. We will use real species, landscape, climate, and human impact data to explore biogeographic rules, such as the latitudinal & elevation diversity gradients. We will also learn about how landscape ecologists use species distribution models and corridor models for conservation purposes.

Chemical Principles II

This Honors Program section of Chemical Principles II differs from traditional large lectures in two key areas: First, core chemical concepts are introduced by considering "big questions" in chemistry, typically pertaining to the challenge of powering the planet with clean energy. For instance, how do catalytic converters mitigating transportation emissions, and what are the impacts on pricing and availability of precious metals?

Chemical Principles II Laboratory

The laboratory portion of this course focuses on foundational principles and essential techniques of chemistry.  These conceptual and technical tools have great relevance to many issues of importance to society, including climate change, human health, economic security, and more. SLS-related experiments in CHEM 1211K will be related to five threads of sustainability in chemistry: Green Chemistry, Chemistry and Society, Everyday Chemical Analysis, Computational Chemistry, and Climate Change.

Introduction to Environmental Science

Understanding our planet’s environment requires understanding how the whole Earth functions as an interconnected system. This course investigates the four components of the Earth system in detail: the atmosphere, the oceans, the solid Earth, and the biosphere to understand how these processes interact, and then how we, as humans, impact our planet.