Civic Design

Civic Design

Civic design is the use of design inquiry and making to address societal issues and contribute to our communal lives. The methods are open and participatory and strive to foster and sustain direct democracy and radical pluralism. Civic design spans formal and informal contexts and practices, and includes organizations, systems, environments, media and communications. 

Urban and Regional Economics

In Urban Economics, Atlanta is an interesting city. It is one of the most segregated cities ethnically and economically. It is one of the most sprawled cities in the US. The unique features affect your life. Atlanta shows very low inter-generational income mobility. Drivers spend so much time stuck in traffic. We study urban economic theory to explain how the city characteristics affect your life.

Big Data and Public Policy

The School of Public Policy is offering a new cross-listed course with the School of Economics in Big Data and Public Policy. This course will provide an introduction to data science tools and methodologies for social science applications. Students will learn to conduct experiments and to identify causal mechanisms in large-scale social and administrative data. The course is targeted for Ph.D. or advanced M.S. students in Public Policy; M.S. students in Economics, and M.S. students in Cybersecurity

Curating Safe Space: LIVE WORK LEARN PLAY GROW

In partnership with The Pride School Atlanta, this course explores advocacy through the design of space at three scales of architecture (in this case, as the design of building): interior space, the building, and the landscape. Can architects re-imagine the future of educational spaces and social equity by placing attention to the bidirectional relationships of space and behavior within the context of gender equality and human rights? Can advocacy become a mainstream practice, a political voice, for architects?

Vertically Integrated Project: Civic Design

The purpose of this course is to research and develop information, communication, and media systems to address regional civic issues, using techniques from design, computing, and social sciences, in collaboration with government and community partners.  These systems will have real-world impact, and promote social sustainability, equity, and justice.

London Olympic Park Stadium Multi-Criteria Decision Matrix Exercise

In preparation for the 2012 Olympic Games in London, the Olympic Delivery Authority (ODA) faced an unprecedented design challenge: create an 80,000 capacity stadium with the flexibility to be converted to a 25,000 capacity venue after the Games, and do this while achieving the ODA’s sustainability objectives. In the case study below, you’ll discover how they achieved the brief through innovative design and engineering. Furthermore, you’ll use this tool to learn more about how you, too, can make difficult design choices without compromising sustainability. To that end, this tool introduces you to the Multi-Criteria Decision Matrix, or, Values-based Decision Making.

Urban Farming & Community Gardens

Starting a community garden in an abandoned vacant lot is a good way to address blight in a neighborhood. This project builds on the dataset of Westside Atlanta property surveys and walks the students through the process of starting a community garden to selling its produce on farmers markets. It emphasizes the social aspect of community building and the importance of buying local.

Rodent Control

This is a collection of assignments around the problem of rodent infestation in cities, which has become a pressing problem following the mild winters in 2015-16. The assignments are designed to 1) develop mapping and data analysis skills, 2) give meaningful ideas for application prototyping, and 3) foster thinking about community engagement. This is based on an up-to-date (2017) dataset of rat sightings in New York City and an on-going collaboration between Georgia Tech and the community of English Avenue.

Getting to Know our Georgia Tech Through Journaling

This journaling tool, based on a lesson created by Yelena Rivera-Vale and Kristina Chatfield, introduces first year students to Georgia Tech’s efforts to create a sustainable campus community. Touring sites on campus, documenting the tour experience through journaling and photography, and considering the ways that sustainable design can impact the environment, equity, and economy will teach students about how effective sustainable design impacts both Georgia Tech and the wider Atlanta community.